Century of Politics


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Politics from the 1860s-1893s considered something known as the Gilded Age. The Gilded age was a period of corruption, shoddy ethics, bad morals, and it basically being all about the rich. This era of time was right after the civil war. The Gilded age really transformed America in a lot of ways. There is a major issue when the congress was referred to as the “rich mans club”. It just goes to show that it was all about the rich and it shows how corrupt it actually was. By the end of the Gilded Age, America was the leading industrial nation by the end of this time era but the only problem was the destruction that came with it all.  There was destruction caused in the plains Indians,  more and  more discrimination against African Americans, and the environment degradation that was caused from lack of care. Was all the industrialization and growth worth ruining the environment and ethics that America was based upon?

During the 19th century women were constantly fighting for women’s rights including the right to vote. In 1848, the Seneca Falls convention really marked the beginning of this movement in the United States. This movement was full of individuals fully committed to changing society and the role that women had in it. Ever since this movement started, women have started to work their way into society and women have gained their basic human rights and to this day women still fight for rights and to be viewed equal to men. Politics were for the rich during the 19th century. It was all about America getting to the top and nobody cared about all the destruction that would come with it. The people in charge of the government only cared about the money and America becoming the richest and best country in the world.  Women did not really have a whole lot of say in politics during this time period. Women however did start becoming more educated. Men had a much bigger say and had more opportunity to work in roles that had to do with government and law enforcement.

The right to vote was ratified in 1870. This was known as the 15th amendment. This was a huge step for American politics. It was a huge step into improving equality and the basic human rights everyone should have in America.

BIBOLOGRAPHY

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/boundless-ushistory/chapter/the-gilded-age/

https://oureverydaylife.com/mens-roles-1800s-8698379.html

13 thoughts on “Century of Politics

  1. “Women however did start becoming more educated.”

    And that process of becoming more educated was a powerful foundation for women gaining equality and power in the future. It is extremely hard to hold a group of people down that isn’t ignorant. Knowledge truly is power, especially when used on a collective level.

    1. I completely agree! If women didn’t start to get higher education it would be easier for others to keep voting and other rights from them. Since they were getting higher education and becoming more and more involved in society it was hard to keep these rights from them. At the turn of the century women were fighting for their rights and breaking out of their domestic sphere. I believe this was very important because women could still be stuck in this sphere today if they didn’t fight for their rights.

      1. Once women won the right to vote politicians concentrated on women in order to obtain more votes. Women took advantage of that and fought for laws that would benefit them. I think women were educated and smart for doing this and made life better for all of us to this day..

  2. I thought it was funny how you referred to the Gilded Age as a period of “basically all about being rich.” It’s silly to think that way, but it’s nothing further than the truth. My view on the way politics happened during the Gilded Age are much like yours, it’s all about the rich and it’s “the rich man’s club.” It’s crazy to think at one point women didn’t have many rights and were looked down upon, but today there are many women who are very important and are role models to several people.

  3. It is really crazy seeing how far we have came today. In some ways i also think that the rich are still able to influence how votes turn out. But since the 1800s it really has become much better, today almost anybody is able to vote. Its also crazy hearing how women weren’t able to vote but today no matter what race or gender you can vote. It is really amazing seeing how we have transformed and creating a society more for the people.

  4. I think that the destruction that all of the industrialization caused is very commonly overlooked. This is so easy to do because of the numerous advantages to having an industrialized country. Women being educated was a huge step towards their equality. Without the knowledge they had from being properly educated, women would not have known how to fight for their freedoms in a way in which they could succeed and be heard. Without an education, women would have continued being walked all over. Being educated also helped women to be more involved in society. This was good because of how society was back then, with those in authority only being rich white men.

  5. Your comment: “Politics were for the rich during the 19th century. It was all about America getting to the top and nobody cared about all the destruction that would come with it.” really stood out to me. The rich paid their way in politics and were selfish. They made decisions that would benefit themselves and didn’t care who it hurt.

    1. I also agree with your comment. After reading more and more about history, I’m starting to notice a pattern here. The rich and powerful people always act in selfish ways and disregard the destruction it has on others. It’s unfortunate that they couldn’t see how respecting others would’ve gotten them a lot farther.

  6. It truly is inspiring how much really changed within the last century or so that was jump started within this era. I can’t even imagine where we would be today if everyone just ignored the atrocities that were simply the norm back then. It almost seems like our driving force of change has begun to stagnate in the modern age, I wonder if the majority is simply content. I am curious to see exactly what the tipping point was for the “rich man’s club,” being both wealthy and powerful would’ve made them hard to remove.

  7. It’s really interesting to see just how much was going on during this time with the womens suffrage movement but also with the increasing gap between government and the people. Often times people think of the Vietnam War as a time when people really began questioning the government and thinking it as elitist and wrong but this was a time when the corruption within congress was blatant and when people knew to be anyone you had to be one of the wealthy elites. But this was a time of increased industrialization and when America seemed like it was booming. The reality was a rotten and corrupt society with huge inequality, several human rights issues, the naming of this time period as ‘gilded’ is incredibly accurate.

  8. I also believe America was a rich man’s world at this time as well. The rich made all the rules in my opinion and women were treated as beneath the man. Women needed a voice in a world ruled by man. Once women were given the right to vote politics starting becoming more open to suggestion I feel. Women needed to fight for there rights but men were given rights. I never understood that. It is amazing how far politics and America has come along. I only hope we will still see some change as time goes by. But alas time will only tell and change is hard for this world to deal with.

  9. You end your piece by saying the following:

    “The right to vote was ratified in 1870. This was known as the 15th amendment. This was a huge step for American politics. It was a huge step into improving equality and the basic human rights everyone should have in America.”

    You are correct in that the 15th amendment did make some stride in equality, as it stopped considering property-owning men of color as two-thirds of a person. At the time, each African-American man, who owned property,” was permitted to vote. However, their one vote only equaled two-thirds of an actual vote. This amendment expanded the requirements one must have to vote. You not longer had to own property, and everyone one man’s vote was considered equal to another man’s vote. It goes to prove your original idea that the people were treated with prejudice, and equality was suffering at this time.

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