Seneca Falls


 

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Starting in the 1830’s individuals voices criticized the way American law and defined gender relations began to be heard. The 1848 Declaration of Sentiments combined these concerns into a manifest and offered change that would change the whole women’s rights movement. In the same year, the New York village of Seneca Falls hosted a gathering of around three hundred people. and debated the Declaration of Sentiments. The Seneca Falls women’s rights convention marked the beginning of the women’s rights  movement. It developed movements, wars and revolutions.

The Seneca Falls led to a transformation and movement of empowering on behalf of half the human race. The Seneca Falls convention in 1848 wasn’t recognized as significant. The building that held all the meetings wasn’t even recognized at first and went through many different purposes like a laundry mat. After the revival of modern feminism and the advances of the field of women’s history the convention is now recognized.  Another accomplishment was after a lot of work they finally made the building a historical building.

In the 1840 World antislavery convention in London representatives of femaleantislavery societies were denied seating and voting rights. This angered a lot of people. They decided to set up a meeting in the United States. They set out the word in the local paper and the abolitionist press that it would be on the 19th and 20th of July in Seneca Falls. The message spread quickly though the North and Midwest and led to the formation of a national movement because reforms attending had family, church, and political affiliations.

The first national convention on Women’s rights was held in Worcester Massachusetts in 1850. By 1860, ten national and local women’s rights conventions had been organized. Sixty-eight women and thirty-two men signed their names on to a Declaration of sentiments which provided a model for future women’s rights conventions.  Although at first women were shot down and not able to participate in voting they made great advancements with a lot of work. The women of Seneca Falls made history in the women’s rights convention and changed women’s lives and abilities for the future.

10 thoughts on “Seneca Falls

  1. Shelby, I was shocked to read that the building in which the convention took place was used as a laundromat! To me, that’s beyond disrespectful to the women who organized and signed the Declaration. At the same time, it shows how our nation used to value women and feminism throughout history – it didn’t. However, I’m content that it is now a historical landmark, and if I am ever near Seneca Falls, I will definitely check out the Wesleyan Chapel.

    1. I felt the same way that is so disrespectful to women that they would put then in a laundry mat room that just isn’t right! Women deserved to be treated just like men if not better they do so many things and now in today’s age there are a lot of women in power. It would be so cool to visit Seneca falls would be awesome that would be a cool place to take like a class trip to if it was possible!

    2. I agree it is disgraceful how little respect was shown to women of this time and even later on when remembering and honoring our history. The rights these women fought for are ones that so many women today take for granted.

  2. I felt the same way that is so disrespectful to women that they would put then in a laundry mat room that just isn’t right! Women deserved to be treated just like men if not better they do so many things and now in today’s age there are a lot of women in power. It would be so cool to visit Seneca falls would be awesome that would be a cool place to take like a class trip to if it was possible!

  3. Wow, I didn’t know that the building was used as a laundry mat, that just shows the disregard for women. To not even acknowledge what they were trying to do. This really shows how strong these women and men actually were because they did not get discouraged. Good post!

    1. I also didn’t know the building was used as an laundry mat and to think everyone or majority of people let this happen is super disrespectful to women. To think women weren’t shown as much respect as they are in nowadays makes me feel really disappointed in that time era. Your post really intrigued me!

  4. I am fired up reading that the building that they were using was a laundry mat. That is so stereotyped as well, and degrading to women. For them to still keep going to get the job done, is inspirational. The building now being a historical landmark is amazing, and should be a message to anyone trying to be the change the world needs. Starting small is part of the process into making big changes. Also, referring to an earlier comment, a field trip would be a cool idea!

  5. I am so glad that you included the fact that the building used was a laundry mat, it definitely shows how much disregard people had toward women and that they did not want people to take them seriously. I am also glad that the building is now a historical landmark, it can be used as a reminder of how far we’ve come as a society. The Declaration of Sentiments was definitely a great starting point for women to push for equality.

  6. I enjoyed the fact that the laundry mat stuck out to most people and really angered people. I never thought of the stereotype aspect of it and now it really has me thinking. I don’t know how these women kept getting knocked down, but got right back up and got exactly what they wanted even if it was just for something like a building that didn’t mean anything to most people.

    1. The idea that the building where the convention was held was used as a filling station in the 1950s and a housed laundromat in the 1960s definitely stung. But on a positive note, it is very inspiring to think that–even after all of those years of being totally disregarded–the eventual advances of the Women’s History field were able to give the Seneca Falls Convention the proper recognition it deserved. If passionate people can turn this building into a protected historic site after all that time, imagine what we can accomplish today!

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