The Internment of Japanese Americans: Something We Shouldn’t Have Done

The bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 shocked many Americans. Many people thought it to be an inside job and believed rumors that said Japanese-American farmers helped the Japanese in the attack. No evidence was found to prove this, and Japanese-Americans were too vital to the economy of Hawaii to be deported. Even so, Japanese Americans were still considered a possible threat to the mainland. … Continue reading The Internment of Japanese Americans: Something We Shouldn’t Have Done

To Fear The Japanese or Not?

Japan attacked the United States Of America in 1941, it was an act of war that Americans took serious. The island of Honolulu was bombed in a viscous and earth shattering attack, more than 2,000 people were killed and over 1,000 left wounded. This unforgivable event instilled fear and hatred into the hearts of every American. In an almost immediate reaction, President Roosevelt signed the … Continue reading To Fear The Japanese or Not?

Japanese internment during the war

On December 7th 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. US citizens feared another attack and war this fear seized the country. State reps pressured President Roosevelt to take action against those of Japanese descent. On February 19th, 1942, Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. Under the terms of the Order, some 120,000 people of Japanese descent living in the US were removed from their homes and … Continue reading Japanese internment during the war

A Fault in Our History: Japanese American Internment

December 7th, 1941; a day that forever changed history. It was the day that Pearl Harbor, a U.S. naval base located in Hawaii, was attacked by Japan. Following this event, the United States declared war on Japan, but also declared incarceration on its Japanese American citizens. Because of the attack the United States endured, Japanese Americans were suspected of being loyal to their ancestral land. … Continue reading A Fault in Our History: Japanese American Internment

The American Internment of Japanese Americans

The United States naval base at Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. Due to the attack, society was afraid that all Japanese and Japanese Americans were a threat if they were near any military bases. This caused Franklin D. Roosevelt, the President of the United States, to sign an Executive Order 9066. This order permitted the military to declare certain … Continue reading The American Internment of Japanese Americans

Blog Topic #5 for HIS 222

Topic: Discuss the American internment of Japanese Americans.  Consider the national justification for internment, living conditions, and the impact on Japanese Americans.  How do you think the internment of Japanese Americans affected their conceptions of citizenship?  How would you feel if you were in the same position: a law-abiding, American citizen who was rounded up and essentially jailed for something beyond your control? Continue reading Blog Topic #5 for HIS 222

Pro’s & Con’s of a Controversy: Prohibition

On January 16, 1920 the full effect of prohibition was upon the United States. The Senate voted in favor of prohibition the day the 18thAmendment was proposed in 1917. By 1919 the needed number of states adopted it. To begin I would like to clarify a common misconception about the 18thAmendment, the amendment does not prohibit the consumption of alcohol but rather the sale, manufacturing … Continue reading Pro’s & Con’s of a Controversy: Prohibition

To Prohibition or Not to Prohibition

When thinking of the 1920’s one might think about a time of Prohibition.  A constitutional amendment (18th Amendment) that was passed in 1919 that banned the sale, manufacture, and transportation of intoxicating liquors.  As grown adults, most of us don’t prefer to be told how we should live our lives or what we should or shouldn’t partake in, yet the government believed it was acting … Continue reading To Prohibition or Not to Prohibition

American Prohibition: Was It Worth It?

Prohibition, a legislation which banned most forms of alcohol in the United States, was the ultimate goal of the American Temperance Movement. Those who believed prohibition was good were referred to as drys and those who viewed it more negatively were called wets (Keene). Many drys believed that alcohol had the ability to part families and caused more problems that it was worth, while wets … Continue reading American Prohibition: Was It Worth It?

The Good, The Bad, & the Ugly: Prohibition

As anything we do in our lives, there is a different choice that you could make. I could decide to go out on Saturday night with my friends, or I could stay home and play video games and watch college football. I could chose to eat healthy for a certain period of time, aka a diet, and do that until I see the results I … Continue reading The Good, The Bad, & the Ugly: Prohibition

Government and Labor: The Progressive Era

(Pictured: A Lewis Hine photograph showing child workers in the during the Progressive Era) The Progressive Era was a time of great social, economic, and political change for the United States. This period, which was marked by trust-busting from presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson; changing attitudes in favor of an activist and regulatory government; and advances in workers’ rights, … Continue reading Government and Labor: The Progressive Era

Why the Government Should Regulate Big Business

During the time of the Progressive Era, workers had almost no rights when it came to their job. They couldn’t easily negotiate their working hours, the conditions the worked in were awful, they made very little money and, at times, had to make their children work just to be able to pay for food. The reason factory working conditions were so bad, is that the … Continue reading Why the Government Should Regulate Big Business

The Progressive Era: Times Are Changing

For starters, lets discuss who the progressives are and when this time took place. The Progressive Era was between 1895-1915 and consisted mainly of white, middle-class, college educated women. The progressives had interest in child labor, political corruption, industrial abuse, food and drug regulation, woman suffrage, and several more. They are pro government and supportive of the law, but do not agree or like political … Continue reading The Progressive Era: Times Are Changing

Blog Topic #3 for HIS 222 INET

Blog Topic: Thinking about the diverse group of reformers that historians call the “Progressives,” discuss the following questions.  What were the Progressives attempting to accomplish through regulation?  Should the government set hours laws, regulate safety, prohibit child labor, set a minimum wage, and institute other work laws? Continue reading Blog Topic #3 for HIS 222 INET

The Growing Power of the Populists in the 19th Century

The 19th century saw a great deal of political change for the United States. Numerous political parties emerged from the mid-late 1800s. One of such would be the People’s Party. This political party was formed because of farmers’ demands to solve the problem of the falling prices of their products. The People’s Party (or Populists, as they were known as) gained a lot of power … Continue reading The Growing Power of the Populists in the 19th Century

Politics

Times started to change for men and women. Women started to have more time on their hands and wanted to do more but politically it was still a man’s game as they say. Some woman started to go to college but they could only be in contact with other women. (17.3.2). Women started clubs but they were divided. Women started to fight for their rights … Continue reading Politics

The great change politically and economically.

The United States started growing tremendously in 1860. Agriculture becoming more mechanized, resulting in less work for farmers in rural areas. Families started moving to cities where the men could work in factories, and women and children could work as servants. This lead to extreme lifestyle changes that people were not prepared for. They came to the city looking for new opportunists with brighter futures. … Continue reading The great change politically and economically.

political system during the turn of the century

During the gilded age America was going through rapid economic changes that resulted in lots of americans being mistreated at work. Rich men who ran large corporations filled with hard working americans using their wealth to persuade or buy votes or have laws made in their favor. Politics through history has always been viewed as a wealthy mans game. Things Started to change during this era. the … Continue reading political system during the turn of the century

Blog Post #2 for HIS 222 INET

Blog Topic: Consider politics at the turn of the century.  More than half the population was still disenfranchised.  With women not having the vote and African Americans discriminated against, how do you think the political process worked?  Do you think that politics were considered an arena for the rich only?  How did women, minorities, and working men impact the political process? Continue reading Blog Post #2 for HIS 222 INET

Industrial Revolution and the struggles there of.

Many workers during the Industrial Revolution (Late 1800’s Early 1900’s) sought for relief form poor, hazardous and in-humane working conditions.  Most hoped to find that relief within a few different labor unions that started to pop up throughout the nation. With ample capital, an abundance of raw matierials, cheap labor and new technology, these  new found “Robber Barons”, greedy capitalists who grew rich by deious … Continue reading Industrial Revolution and the struggles there of.

The Workforce of America’s Gilded Age

        The industrialization of the United States during the Gilded Age had a massive effect on workers. Before the industrial revolution, according to Keene, most crafts such as shoemaking required skilled labor, but with the invention of machines, like Jan Matzeliger’s lasting machine, these skilled trades soon became unskilled jobs, where workers could just pull levers and have the machine do the … Continue reading The Workforce of America’s Gilded Age

Industrial Revolution: The Struggle was Real

During the Industrial Revolution in the late 1800s, many workers were facing hardships. Employers ruled the working industry by making their own rules, and harsh working conditions. Because of the industrialism, which the era of raw materials, cheap labor, and new technology (Ch. 16 PowerPoint), many American families faced hard times. Employees experienced extremely low wages, very unsafe working conditions, and no where to go to improve. These low wages … Continue reading Industrial Revolution: The Struggle was Real