“A Change Is Gonna Come”: The Movements Defining the 1960s

(Pictured above: Gay pride protestors reference the 1969 Stonewall Riots.) “Hope will never be silent,” Harvey Milk, the first openly gay elected politician, once stated (Worthington). As the divisive war in Vietnam raged overseas during the 1960s, many long-marginalized groups at home in the United States decided to make their voices heard and demand better treatment in American government and society. From the late 1950s … Continue reading “A Change Is Gonna Come”: The Movements Defining the 1960s

1950 – 1970’s Movements for Equality

The movements of the 1950’s-1970’s have effects that can still be felt today. Marginalized communities came together to fight for equality so that they could improve their lives and make strides so that their children could have a chance at better lives than they had. When looking at all of the groups now they all are significantly in better places than they were before they … Continue reading 1950 – 1970’s Movements for Equality

The 1950s-70s: The Battle for Equal Rights

In America, the 1950s through the 1970s was a time where change started to occur when it came to Civil Rights. Segregation between races were being resolved but conflict stood in the way for African Americans to obtain their rights as humans. The fight for Woman’s rights was also going on, as they wanted their voice to be heard and have the right the vote … Continue reading The 1950s-70s: The Battle for Equal Rights

Civil Rights: Equal for All?

When asked what is known of the history of the United States, it is a fair assumption to think that many minds will go to war, segregation between races, and the fight for women’s rights. Many are not aware of the many similarities between these three things and how they all in turn would fall under the category of Civil Rights. The 1950’s through the … Continue reading Civil Rights: Equal for All?

The Vietnam War: An American Perspective

The Vietnam War had a large impact on Americans lives, whether they were fighting or not. Many aspects of people’s lives changed, especially the role that media played. Media was used for a variety of things, most commonly entertainment, and was fairly easy to access. When the Vietnam War began, the media was very informative about what was happening over in Vietnam. People could see … Continue reading The Vietnam War: An American Perspective

America’s Resistance

The Vietnam War was a long, lasting war. America put in time, money, and, at some point, soldiers to help fight against the spread of communism in Vietnam for about thirty years. The war was the largest air war; America dropped nearly five billion tons of bomb (Keene 26.2). With Vietnam being close to China and the Soviet Union, the United States feared that Vietnam … Continue reading America’s Resistance

Vietnam War: America Wants Peace

The Vietnam war affected the United States tremendously! Considering the war was so lengthy, they suffered many, many casualties to the point where they could not keep track of who the deceased bodies were. According to the reading, 47,415 people died due to battle and 10,785 died of other causes (26.16). The war cost the nation $173 billion (26.4.3). This war lasted through five presidencies … Continue reading Vietnam War: America Wants Peace

Impacting Vietnam and American war

The Vietnam and American war was one of the longest wars. During this war the United States had 5 presidents involved. This war took a lot of casualties. They believed that they were winning the war by how big the body count was, but little did they know they could barely tell who was who.  There was even a political cartoon made about how they … Continue reading Impacting Vietnam and American war

The Internment of Japanese Americans: Something We Shouldn’t Have Done

The bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 shocked many Americans. Many people thought it to be an inside job and believed rumors that said Japanese-American farmers helped the Japanese in the attack. No evidence was found to prove this, and Japanese-Americans were too vital to the economy of Hawaii to be deported. Even so, Japanese Americans were still considered a possible threat to the mainland. … Continue reading The Internment of Japanese Americans: Something We Shouldn’t Have Done

To Fear The Japanese or Not?

Japan attacked the United States Of America in 1941, it was an act of war that Americans took serious. The island of Honolulu was bombed in a viscous and earth shattering attack, more than 2,000 people were killed and over 1,000 left wounded. This unforgivable event instilled fear and hatred into the hearts of every American. In an almost immediate reaction, President Roosevelt signed the … Continue reading To Fear The Japanese or Not?

Japanese internment during the war

On December 7th 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. US citizens feared another attack and war this fear seized the country. State reps pressured President Roosevelt to take action against those of Japanese descent. On February 19th, 1942, Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. Under the terms of the Order, some 120,000 people of Japanese descent living in the US were removed from their homes and … Continue reading Japanese internment during the war

A Fault in Our History: Japanese American Internment

December 7th, 1941; a day that forever changed history. It was the day that Pearl Harbor, a U.S. naval base located in Hawaii, was attacked by Japan. Following this event, the United States declared war on Japan, but also declared incarceration on its Japanese American citizens. Because of the attack the United States endured, Japanese Americans were suspected of being loyal to their ancestral land. … Continue reading A Fault in Our History: Japanese American Internment

The American Internment of Japanese Americans

The United States naval base at Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. Due to the attack, society was afraid that all Japanese and Japanese Americans were a threat if they were near any military bases. This caused Franklin D. Roosevelt, the President of the United States, to sign an Executive Order 9066. This order permitted the military to declare certain … Continue reading The American Internment of Japanese Americans

Blog Topic #5 for HIS 222

Topic: Discuss the American internment of Japanese Americans.  Consider the national justification for internment, living conditions, and the impact on Japanese Americans.  How do you think the internment of Japanese Americans affected their conceptions of citizenship?  How would you feel if you were in the same position: a law-abiding, American citizen who was rounded up and essentially jailed for something beyond your control? Continue reading Blog Topic #5 for HIS 222

Pro’s & Con’s of a Controversy: Prohibition

On January 16, 1920 the full effect of prohibition was upon the United States. The Senate voted in favor of prohibition the day the 18thAmendment was proposed in 1917. By 1919 the needed number of states adopted it. To begin I would like to clarify a common misconception about the 18thAmendment, the amendment does not prohibit the consumption of alcohol but rather the sale, manufacturing … Continue reading Pro’s & Con’s of a Controversy: Prohibition

To Prohibition or Not to Prohibition

When thinking of the 1920’s one might think about a time of Prohibition.  A constitutional amendment (18th Amendment) that was passed in 1919 that banned the sale, manufacture, and transportation of intoxicating liquors.  As grown adults, most of us don’t prefer to be told how we should live our lives or what we should or shouldn’t partake in, yet the government believed it was acting … Continue reading To Prohibition or Not to Prohibition

American Prohibition: Was It Worth It?

Prohibition, a legislation which banned most forms of alcohol in the United States, was the ultimate goal of the American Temperance Movement. Those who believed prohibition was good were referred to as drys and those who viewed it more negatively were called wets (Keene). Many drys believed that alcohol had the ability to part families and caused more problems that it was worth, while wets … Continue reading American Prohibition: Was It Worth It?

The Good, The Bad, & the Ugly: Prohibition

As anything we do in our lives, there is a different choice that you could make. I could decide to go out on Saturday night with my friends, or I could stay home and play video games and watch college football. I could chose to eat healthy for a certain period of time, aka a diet, and do that until I see the results I … Continue reading The Good, The Bad, & the Ugly: Prohibition

Government and Labor: The Progressive Era

(Pictured: A Lewis Hine photograph showing child workers in the during the Progressive Era) The Progressive Era was a time of great social, economic, and political change for the United States. This period, which was marked by trust-busting from presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson; changing attitudes in favor of an activist and regulatory government; and advances in workers’ rights, … Continue reading Government and Labor: The Progressive Era

Why the Government Should Regulate Big Business

During the time of the Progressive Era, workers had almost no rights when it came to their job. They couldn’t easily negotiate their working hours, the conditions the worked in were awful, they made very little money and, at times, had to make their children work just to be able to pay for food. The reason factory working conditions were so bad, is that the … Continue reading Why the Government Should Regulate Big Business